Difference between cavern and cave?

Hi, what is the difference between a cavern and a cave in the ocean – when scuba diving?

Do you need special skills for both?

I assume you are diving!

PADI cosider a cavern to be the area of an overhead environment that is still lit by natural light.
A cave requires lighting artificially.
Special training is required for either as you will be in an overhead environment with no direct access to the surface.

If you are interested in either, contact your local PADI school for Cavern or your local cave diving assoc.

6 Responses to “Difference between cavern and cave?”

  1. Arthur R Says:

    A cave is generally thought to be above ground i.e. in a mountain whereas a cavern is below ground (or Sea!!) I know it is generalising!
    Before doing any cave/cavern diving you need to be well trained & / or experienced + dive with a more experienced "buddy" it is SO easy to become dis orientated when in these diving situations
    References :

  2. AhAmSt3r-*i\i3\/\/* Says:

    lesse…a cave is…a cave,…. and a cavern is…..um…a bigger cave???
    References :

  3. Robert M Says:

    I assume you are diving!

    PADI cosider a cavern to be the area of an overhead environment that is still lit by natural light.
    A cave requires lighting artificially.
    Special training is required for either as you will be in an overhead environment with no direct access to the surface.

    If you are interested in either, contact your local PADI school for Cavern or your local cave diving assoc.
    References :

  4. Doug Says:

    Per the PADI Instructor Manual:

    "Cavern Diving is defined as any dive conducted within the light zone of a cave. Cave diving is any dive conducted beyond the light zone of a cave. The light zone of a cave is defined as that part of the cave from which natural light illuminating the entrance is visible at all times."

    So, if the cave you are swimming in is so narrow that it is a tube, you leave the light zone nearly upon entering because the light zone is behind you. If you have to turn around to see the entrance, you are no longer in a cavern, but in a cave.

    Yes, special training is required for both cavern and cave diving. Some locations require that you show documentation of cavern/cave diving before diving.
    References :
    PADI Instructor Manual, Specialty Diver Section, Cavern Diver

  5. scubalady01 Says:

    A cavern is basically a large swim-through where you can see the light at the other end. These are generally not dangerous to dive.

    A cave can be an inland water hole or out in the ocean. It can contain fresh water, or salt water or extend across both layers in terms of depth (i.e. there are lots of those in the Dominican Republic, for example).

    The level of difficulty for caves varies greatly, as does the danger. There are small, explored, caves that you can dive without special training, but you must have a guide and at least have taken the advanced course (PADI). If you are even remotely claustrophobic, you should never get into a cave.
    References :
    Experience

  6. don Says:

    Cavern is defined as follows:

    1. Daylight and free ascent zone of cavern
    2. 130 (ft.) linear distance from surface. Some orgs say 200 ft.
    3. Maximum depth not to exceed 70 ft. Some orgs say 100 ft.

    Beyond these limits is a Cave.

    Because you are diving in an overhead environment and cannot directly ascend to the surface in case of an emergency, special skills are required to dive a Cavern or Cave. From the NSS-CDS Cave Diving Safety Notice:

    "NO AMOUNT OF PREVIOUS OPENWATER DIVING EXPERIENCE OR TRAINING CAN ADEQUATELY PREPARE YOU FOR CAVE DIVING."

    For training organizations, NSS-CDS, NACD, GUE, and NAUI are a few of the top institutions. I have included links below that detail the skills and techniques that are required to dive safely in a cave.

    If you would like to experience a Cavern, there are some places in the world that will offer guided Cavern tours. This is quite popular in the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico. The guides need to be either a DM or Instructor with Full Cave certification and Full Cave equipment.

    Because you have not been trained for Caverns, your safety is dependent on your guide. As the result, it's very important to thoroughly research your options. Dennis Weeks of Diablo Divers and Steve Bogaerts of Aztec Diving are exceptional if you are diving in Mexico.
    References :
    http://www.nsscds.com/training_new/aboutcavediving.htm
    http://www.nsscds.com/cavern.htm
    http://www.nsscds.com/cavrncrs.htm
    http://www.safecavediving.com/training.htm
    http://www.cavediving.com/nfl_cave/training/cavern.htm
    http://www.gue.com/Training/Cave/cave1.html
    http://www.naui.com/technical_divers.php#cavern
    http://diablodivers.com/secondary/Cenotes/cenote_cavern_dives.htm
    http://www.aztecdiving.com/guiding.htm

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